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eat me by PAX

"My guts are wrapped in clingfilm...my brain is melted candles," sings Madeline Link on this glowing two track release from Toronto, Ontario brimming with vibrant imagery. Just the latest in a steady IV drip of releases from PAX.

There's well done self-deprecating lyricism on this recording, like a restrained version of 90's grunge self-flagellation. On the opener, Link requests to be tied down to the roof of a car. The same track irreverently juxtaposes holy water with "splishing and splashing" and a backyard pool. Later, words about being ageless but rotten from the inside out, everything tying in with the album's title and deadpan artwork.

Beyond the lyrical, the sounds are pure pop, melodies arcing up and down, awash with a thick saturated film, but nothing harsh. The densely distorted vocals just sound like beams of light. Instrumentally, Harrison-esque lead guitars with bent high notes jangle. The drums add a steady backbone, the bass melds the fuzz alongside Casio keys added to taste, everything fusing together in lo-fi sunburst. Eat it up. Released 5/24/19. Listen below.

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