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Greatest Hits by Untitled Forum

Untitled Forum's Greatest Hits is a record where every song is an anthem. To love, to lost friends and those in crisis, to cockroaches crawling in burning down halfway houses. So poppy, whimsical, detailed with escapades and swirling thoughts on being one's best.

"Where'd you go? I don't need to know," muses Untitled Forum on track two, before running around with a shopping cart, sleeping under highways, "tearing out the numbers that will help me succeed". This caustic third track is perhaps the record's least palatable with an atonal backing sample. But that sound is just a mirror of the narrator's wild journeys, whereas most of the other tracks, especially later, are pleasing ear candy: atmospheric synth pads and keys, acoustic guitar, head-nodding beats.

"We all must change or fade away" goes the refrain at the record's midpoint, supremely quotable like so many of these choruses. On "As Long As You Love Me", perhaps the strongest track (a toss-up between many), Untitled Forum sings "I've heard of a peace of mind words can't describe." Greatest Hits is a record of striving, growing against the odds, lean and lacking filler, because there can be no filler in self-actualization. Just one's Greatest Hits. Released 5/13/19. Listen below and follow here and here.

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